Mud not blood…

My name is Mud, but call me Alowishus Devadander Abercrombie thats long for Mud so Ive been told. ~ Primus

I love the forest after a good rain. Everything sparkles. The silence is broken by birds coming out of their hiding spots, water gurgling down mid-summer-dry streams and the rush of the wind past my ears.

Yesterday, my riding plans were temporarily thwarted by an early-afternoon thunderstorm that brought with it a steady flow of rain to the South Beaver Creek area. As soon as the weather broke, I grabbed my neglected Dual Sus and hit the trails. I had forgotten how much fun the Tracer is. Man, what a ride. Smooth as butter. I purchased a RockShox Recon for this guy late last year and have only had the opportunity to ride it a couple of times. Brad steered me in the right direction on this one. I highly recommend this fork.

So I finally got up into my old stomping grounds in the Roosevelt National Forest near our house. The trails are pretty much clear at this point with some massive drifts still dotting the North-facing slopes from time to time. Totally passable, however. It is interesting how different riding the Dual Sus is as opposed to the Singlespeed. I definitely think that the S2 has helped my “regular” riding. My legs felt great throughout the ride and the little tricks one learns on the Singlespeed come in handy on the standard ride (e.g., conservation of momentum). Good stuff.

The Flume was mostly clear and a bit slippery but that actually can help matters. It is a fairly rocky descent (mostly) that brings you down to a mining claim near the Peak to Peak. The creek here was roaring and the sound of rushing water easily drowned out any road noise. I jammed back up the P2P to my house in a little under 90-minutes. Everything felt great except the lingering ankle issues. I hope to get into the doctor for a peek at that later this week.

Today I am doing the commute on the S2. Took the bus in from Ned and will play back up by ear. I’ll probably end up taking the bus back home as well but may get adventurous and try to ride up Mag or Sugarloaf.

See you out there.

~stubert

Heavy heart…

Mrrrrraaaaaaaaaannnnhhh. ~ Samantha

In order to avoid scaring any readers off with continued tales of woe (our beloved kitty, Samantha died yesterday), I will post a few things I learned during yesterday’s productive, 4+ hour altitude run.

The route I took started from my house and ran down the Beav to Coal Creek Canyon. I then headed east to 97 and up to Magnolia. East briefly on Mag to the Blue Dot trail head tail and backwards on the Dots to Ned. Ned to the High School trails, West Mag and a sneaky trail back to Rollinsville. From there, I pretty much bee-lined it back home. I spun my last mile in about 7 minutes. At least I had that to brighten my spirits. Not sure how far I ran in total but I was pleased with the effort.

Here are some tidbits:

  • Jackets with hoods are necessary. In the ever-changing weather of the Rockies in the Springtime, one needs proper protection. My hooded jacket, unfortunately, is still on its way. I should be able to test-drive it later this week.
  • Drinking is a good thing. No, I don’t mean lugging around bottles of fortified wine, but I do recommend creating a system that works for you to stay hydrated. Yesterday, like most, I ran with my trusty Shuffle, and made sure to drink at the end of each song (at least). This seemed to keep me very well hydrated throughout the run. Good stuff. I also experimented with soda and protein drinks. Both of which seemed to do the trick.
  • There’s no school like the old-school. I dipped into the bag of old tricks and went for the old-school solution of PB&Js for my main “meal”. Seemed to work well. I think this is a combination of my getting better used to eating on the go but regardless, I plan to add the old standard to my new regimen.
  • Eat, drink, eat, drink, repeat. I try to start eating no more than 20 minutes into my longer runs. This helps to get me in the habit of ingesting calories throughout my effort and starts replenishing energy reserves immediately. This also helps me to graze vs. trying to choke down a huge meal all at once. Thanks to Luke for the killer Gorp recipe: Almonds, Pecans, Chocolate-covered Espresso Beans, Dried Cranberries, Sunflower Seeds. Good stuff.

Other than those items, I can report that Blue Dot is almost completely clear as are the Highschool and West Mag trails. Gentlemen, start your bikes.

I am not sure what the plan for Monday entails. Probably a run but we’ll see.

~stubert